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Manuel Izquierdo: Myth, Nature, and Renewal

Hallie Ford Museum of Art
Salem, OR – Jan 19-Mar 24, 2013

Manuel Izquierdo, Running Man

Manuel Izquierdo, Running Man (c. 1963), welded steel [Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Salem OR, Jan 19-Mar 24] Collection: Hallie Ford Museum, gift of the Manuel Izquierdo Trust through Bill Rhoades


Manuel Izquierdo, Constellation

Manuel Izquierdo, Constellation (1981), welded bronze [Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Salem OR, Jan 19-Mar 24] Collection: Hallie Ford Museum, gift of the Manuel Izquierdo Trust through Bill Rhoades


The late Manuel Izquierdo, influential sculptor, printmaker and teacher, had a significant career that spanned six decades. The multi-talented artist was born in Madrid, Spain in 1925, and became a wartime refugee during his teens, fleeing to America with his two siblings in 1942. After a year in New York, they relocated to Portland where Izquierdo studied and taught at the Museum Art School (now Pacific Northwest College of Art). Early on he met well-known artists like Louis Bunce and Frederick Littman, developing his own personal style amidst the regional backdrop of mid-century modernism.

Establishing himself as a prominent figure in Portland’s art community, Izquierdo was a Northwest pioneer of welded metal sculpture and an accomplished printmaker, producing mainly woodcuts in a somewhat narrative style. Izquierdo’s sculptures – characterized by biomorphic forms that shift between semblances of human, plant and mythological subjects – have an underlying quality of surrealism that invites thoughtful dialogue. His dynamic and lyrical forms are playfully organic yet grounded in their clean, crafted shapes and the smooth polished surfaces that distinguish his bronze pieces.

This exhibit features about 50 sculptures drawn from regional collections. Some of the highlights include welded steel works from the mid-1960s, like Running Man, that recall the cubist efforts of Georges Braque in their gentle leanings toward geometric abstraction.

The Hallie Ford Museum is also hosting two complementary exhibits featuring Izquierdo’s works on paper as well as his maquettes and small sculptures, some of which served as a launching point for his better-known larger works.

www.willamette.edu/museum_of_art

Don Normark, Studio of Manuel Izquierdo

Don Normark, Studio of Manuel Izquierdo (1987), photo mosaic [Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Salem OR, Jan 19-Mar 24] Collection of Don Normark, Seattle

Allyn Cantor


 Sat, Feb 16, 2013