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Joan Miró, Figures, Birds, Constellations

Joan Miró, Figures, Birds, Constellations (1976), oil on canvas [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Feb 13-May 26] Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía. © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris 2013

Miró: The Experience of Seeing

Seattle Art Museum
Seattle WA – Feb 13-May 26,2014

Joan Miró, Figure, Birds

Joan Miró, Figure, Birds (1974), oil on canvas [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Feb 13-May 26] Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía. © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris 2013


This exhibit from Museo Reina Sofìa – Spain’s National Museum of Modern Art in Madrid – focuses on the later work of Joan Miró (1893–1983), produced in the last 20 years of his life. In his six-decade career, Miró became an innovator whose style bred a pictorial language that ran throughout his career. His personal iconography blends playful fluid lines, bold colourful forms and surrealist tendencies in lyrical compositions that often touch on subjects of nature, animals and the human figure. This comprehensive exhibit presents Miró’s lesser-known sculptural work in the context of his paintings from the same late period of 1963–1981.

The preeminent Spanish-born artist lived and worked in Paris throughout the 1920s, along with poets, writers and the artistic avant-garde of the time. Like many of his Surrealist contemporaries, Miró worked to break down the traditional notions of creating in favour of Modernist methods. His style developed during this era into a visual vocabulary of curvilinear shapes set in flattened picture planes that conveyed ideas symbolically.

After World War II, Miró returned to Spain. By 1956, he had set up a studio on Mallorca, where he became particularly interested in sculpture and its relationship to painting. Miró used found objects to create symbolic forms made from cast bronze and with earthy surface patinas. While his sculptures were aesthetically more spare and raw than his paintings, they bore many of the same motifs, in this way creating a dialogue between his two- and three-dimensional worlds.

seattleartmuseum.org

Allyn Cantor


Joan Miró, Young Woman

Joan Miró, Young Woman (1967), lost-wax casting, patinated bronze [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Feb 13-May 26] © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris 2013 / collection: Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía


 Thu, Feb 6, 2014