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Beau Dick and Neil Campbell: Supernatural

Contemporary Art Gallery
Vancouver BC Thru Apr 25, 2004

Neil Campbell - Boom, Boom
Neil Campbell, Boom, Boom (1993-2004), vinyl acrylic [Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC, Thru Apr 25, 2004]

The Contemporary Art Gallery is hosting an exhibition curated by Roy Arden featuring the work of Neil Campbell and Beau Dick. Although their work appears radically different in style and materials, Supernatural asks viewers to examine commonalities of intention, technique and effect. The exhibition also questions the “aesthetic apartheid” that relegates First Nations art to museums and not fine art galleries.

Neil Campbell is a Canadian artist who has recently returned to Vancouver after 15 years of living and exhibiting in New York City. His graphic motifs are visually simple and quasi-geometric. He shares an artistic sensibility with Beau Dick that draws on the use of strong symmetry and other formalist qualities. Campbell’s painted designs derive from a wide range of inspirations: from Indian Tantric painting to the entire history of Western art, including both commercial and popular art.

Beau Dick - Pookmis Mask
Beau Dick, Pookmis Mask (2001), wood, paint, feathers, synthetic hair [Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver BC, thru Apr 25]

Beau Dick is considered to be one of the most accomplished traditional carvers and artists on the Northwest Coast today. His work, particularly his painting, is influenced by contemporary European styles. Dick also is known for his interpretations of masks in different tribal styles, which he takes from illustrations of old specimens in museums. This exhibition will showcase his innovative approach to mask-making that incorporates traditional Kwakwaka’wakw images.

www.contemporaryartgallery.ca

Mia Johnson

 Wed, Apr 7, 2004