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Darlene Swan, Just Dandy, Lions

Darlene Swan, Just Dandy, Lions (2011), earthenware clay, glazed [Alberta Craft Council Gallery, Edmonton AB, Mar 30-May 4]

Urban Wild

Alberta Craft Council Gallery
Edmonton AB – Mar 30-May 4, 2013

Connie Pike, Bow Pieces

Connie Pike, Bow Pieces (2011), stoneware clay, glazed [Alberta Craft Council Gallery, Edmonton AB, Mar 30-May 4]


Monika Smith, NIMBY: Ode to Wild Horses

Monika Smith, NIMBY: Ode to Wild Horses (2010), porcelain, unglazed, wood fired [Alberta Craft Council Gallery, Edmonton AB, Mar 30-May 4]


Krista Gowland, Can’t see the Forest for the Trees

Krista Gowland, Can’t see the Forest for the Trees (2013), porcelain, stoneware [Alberta Craft Council Gallery, Edmonton AB, Mar 30-May 4]


Urban Wild features the work of nine members of the Calgary Clay Arts Association, a collective of professional ceramic artists. The participating artists are Mindy Andrews, Connie Cooper, Louise Cormier, Krista Gowland, Connie Pike, Kathy Ransom, Monika Smith, Darlene Swan and Susan Thorpe. Viewers may be familiar with many of the artists from the Urban Wild exhibit in Calgary in 2011, where the pieces were displayed in Open Space’s downtown 7th Avenue window.

The Alberta Craft Council exhibit showcases ceramic pieces exploring conceptual notions of “wild” and wilderness in the urban environment. The works range from functional to sculptural, from single pieces to installations. As the curators note, the wild doesn’t necessarily go away when cities are built, and there are often unintended consequences. Some are striking yet familiar: the shadow of flying geese on downtown highrises, bunnies and birds in corner lots and parks, mushrooms and dandelions along laneways and sidewalks.

The works in the exhibit have a gentle touch and unassuming appearance. Many are playful and even whimsical. The wild horses that once pastured in today’s suburbs are captured on a Grecian-style urn, and a set of tall skinny buildings are topped with fir trees.

Mia Johnson


 Thu, Apr 4, 2013