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Gina Pane, Action de chasse. C’est la nuit chérie (Hunting Action. It’s the Cherished Night)

Gina Pane, Action de chasse. C’est la nuit chérie (Hunting Action. It’s the Cherished Night) (1979-1981), 24 framed drawings in ink and graphite on Canson grey paper, wooden element [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Mar 1-Jun 8] Collection Fonds Régional d’Art Contemporain des Pays de la Loire, Carquefou, France / Photo: Paul Hester

Parallel Practices: Joan Jonas & Gina Pane

Henry Art Gallery
Seattle WA – Mar 1-Jun 8, 2014

Gina Pane, Action Escalade non-anesthésiée (Action Non-anaesthetized Climb)

Gina Pane, Action Escalade non-anesthésiée (Action Non-anaesthetized Climb) (1971), black and white photographs and steel [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Mar 1-Jun 8] Photographer: Françoise Masson. Collection Musée National d’Art Moderne/Centre Pompidou, Paris. Photo: Nancy O’Connor


Joan Jonas, Mirror Piece I

Joan Jonas, Mirror Piece I (1969), chromogenic color print [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Mar 1-Jun 8] Collection of the artist. Photo: Paul Hester


This exhibition brings together the work of two pioneering female performance artists, Joan Jonas (b. 1936) and Gina Pane (1939-1990). Both proto-feminist artists chose a multi-disciplinary approach to art making and are recognized for their break-through contributions to the budding field of performance art during the socially turbulent late 1960s and early 1970s. Jonas and Pane share an interest in time-based media and explore the themes of the body and questions of gender identity as a means of engaging and heightening emotions.

Born in New York City, Jonas started her career as a sculptor. She was highly influenced by the New York art scene during the 1960s, taking a non-linear approach to art making. During a trip to Japan, she acquired a Sony Portapak video recorder, the first to be owned in the United States. Her early experiments with video art are among the most enduring investigations of the medium. A hallmark of Jonas’s work is the combination of moving images and sculpture. Her pieces often contain fragmentary happenings that investigate physical, temporal and televised space.

Pane was born in Biarritz, France, and worked primarily in Paris, where she was one of the founders of the 1970s French body-art movement, L’art corporel. Her performances of self-inflicted painful happenings, meant to shock viewers out of complacency, are among her best-known action pieces. Her later work also used the relationship of the body to the world. She often created montages of photographic imagery, drawings, notations and sculpture that documented and contextualized her performances. This exhibit is the first comprehensive look at Pane’s work in the U.S.

henryart.org

Allyn Cantor


 Sun, Apr 6, 2014