Home Contact | Advertising Subscribe
Search Listings
Alberta British Columbia Oregon Washington
Exhibition Previews
Gallery Websites
Conservation Corner

SEARCH EDITORIAL
To find gallery listings use search at page top right.

  Back

Sarah Smuts-Kennedy, Principle of Hope

Sarah Smuts-Kennedy, Principle of Hope (2010), digital video, infinite loop [Wil Aballe Art Projects, Vancouver BC, Apr 10-May 10]

The Seasons Have Changed But We Have Not

Wil Aballe Art Projects
Vancouver BC – Apr 10-May 10, 2014

Sean Alward, Double Invasive (Norwegian Maple and Sword Fern)

Sean Alward, Double Invasive (Norwegian Maple and Sword Fern) (2014), inkjet print on paper from photo of solar contact print on plant material [Wil Aballe Art Projects, Vancouver BC, Apr 10-May 10]


Christopher Rodrigues, Still Life 03

Christopher Rodrigues, Still Life 03 (2010), Cibachrome print face-mounted to Plexiglas, backed and braced with aluminum [Wil Aballe Art Projects, Vancouver BC, Apr 10-May 10]


Christopher Rodrigues, Still Life 07

Christopher Rodrigues, Still Life 07 (2010), Cibachrome print face-mounted to Plexiglas, backed and braced with aluminum [Wil Aballe Art Projects, Vancouver BC, Apr 10-May 10]

Jeffrey Hallbauer, Tulips in Port Moody

Jeffrey Hallbauer, Tulips in Port Moody, detail (2014), oil on canvas [Wil Aballe Art Projects, Vancouver BC, Apr 10-May 10]

Taking its title from the Latin word for a “place for life,” this timely group exhibition features the work of five artists who work in a variety of mediums and who explore plants and plant life as their subject. In some cases, the works focus on the materiality of the plants themselves; in others, on the relationship between plants and the larger cultural-historical continuum.

An artist interested in both the formal and social aspects of plants is Sean Alward. In one body of work, chlorophyll provides the colloid for his photographic emulsion. In another, the artist has made photograms of leaves from invasive plants applied over the leaves of domestic species.

While both Vancouver’s Jeffrey Hallbauer and Toronto’s Brad Tinmouth mine Holland’s 17th-century “Tulipmania” financial crisis in painting and sculpture, respectively, Christopher Rodrigues’s photoshopped and collaged scans bring to mind Dutch Golden Age masters Coenraet Roepel and Rachel Ruysch.

The final element in this exhibition is a 25-minute stop-motion animation video by New Zealand’s Sarah Smuts-Kennedy, whose “poetic drama of cause and effect” uses the life cycle of chia seedlings (an Aztec “super food” that was once used as a currency) to comment on political economic policies and their impact on resource exploitation.

waapart.com

Michael Turner


 Fri, Apr 11, 2014