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Isamu Noguchi: Sculptural Design

Seattle Art Museum
Seattle WA Jun 9-Sep 5, 2005

Isamu Noguchi - Sculptural Design, Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Germany
Isamu Noguchi, Sculptural Design, Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Germany, [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jun 9-Sept 5]


Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi (1903-1988) was one of the preeminent sculptors of the 20th century. Noguchi’s work is characterized by an abstract fusion of organic and geometric forms. Believing that sculpture should be experienced in daily life, he applied his biomorphic style to many facets of modern design. This exhibition focuses on contemporary works that blur the boundaries between form and function.

The exhibition features Noguchi’s utilitarian works that brought sculptural forms into the home, such as free-form furniture, tables, ceramics and his Akari paper lamps, as well as his set designs for innovative choreographers like Martha Graham and George Balanchine. Illuminating the diversity of Noguchi’s life work, models of parks, garden designs, fountains and playgrounds are also on exhibit, with classic sculptures such as the bust of George Gershwin and his granite piece, Round Square Space.

Isamu Noguchi - installation
Isamu Noguchi, installation


Isamu Noguchi - installation
Isamu Noguchi, installation

This extraordinary exhibit was designed by acclaimed theater director and artist Robert Wilson, who knew Noguchi. Set up as moody environments where elements of light and sound complement the unique juxtaposition of works, Noguchi’s approach to spatial dynamics continues to speak through the sensory installations created by Wilson. The touring exhibit is accompanied by a colour catalogue and will travel to the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles in 2006.

www.seattleartmuseum.org

Allyn Cantor

 Tue, May 31, 2005