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Ann Lislegaard: 2062

Henry Art Gallery
Seattle WA – Apr 18-Aug 23, 2009

Ann Lislegaard, Bellona (after Samuel R. Delany)

Ann Lislegaard, Bellona (after Samuel R. Delany) (2005) high resolution video projection, wood box screen, 4 speakers [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Apr 18-Aug 23]

Ann Lislegaard, Bellona (after Samuel R. Delany) (2005)

Ann Lislegaard, Bellona (after Samuel R. Delany) (2005) high resolution video projection, wood box screen, 4 speakers [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Apr 18-Aug 23]

Ann Lislegaard, Left Hand of Darkness (after Ursula K. Le Guin) (2008)

Ann Lislegaard, Left Hand of Darkness (after Ursula K. Le Guin) (2008), 3-channel video installation [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Apr 18-Aug 23]

In Ann Lislegaard's first solo exhibition in an American museum, the Danish artist who draws on classic works of science fiction literature, displays six installations of three digital animation works and three altered sound pieces. Encompassing cinematic, architectural and conceptual notions of time, space, identity and uncertainty, Lislegaard's uses sound and light to formulate physical and psychological places that are outside of logic. In her virtual environments, ordinary perceptions of place are re-imagined according to futuristic scenarios and borrowed story lines.

Through loose interpretations of narrative subjects such as J.G. Ballard's 1966 novel The Crystal World, Lislegaard creates a shifting experience similar to Ballard's metaphysical journey. In her dual screen installation Crystal World (after J.G. Ballard), rooms transform into a labyrinth of spaces denoting a voyage to the crystalline universe that is a metaphor for the realm between life and death.

In her other works such as Bellona (after Samuel R. Delany), originally shown at the Danish Pavilion at the 51st Venice Biennale, the video and sound piece is based on a fictional city from Samuel R. Delany's 1974 novel Dhalgren, where reality shifts, transforms, and dissolves. Lislegaard reappropriates this concept into a colourful animated installation of architectural spaces in constant flux, representing a similar uncertainty, deception and disorder.

www.henryart.org

Allyn Cantor


 Sat, Jun 6, 2009