Home Contact | Advertising Subscribe
Search Listings
Alberta British Columbia Oregon Washington
Exhibition Previews
Gallery Websites
Conservation Corner

SEARCH EDITORIAL
To find gallery listings use search at page top right.

  Back

Evergreen Muse: The Art of Elizabeth Colborne

Whatcom Museum
Bellingham WA – Jun 17-Sep 25, 2011

Elizabeth Colborne, Untitled (c. 1925)

Elizabeth Colborne, Untitled (c. 1925), crayon [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Jun 17-Sep 25]

Elizabeth Colborne, Sunset over the Bay, Bellingham

Elizabeth Colborne, Sunset over the Bay, Bellingham (c. 1930), color woodcut [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Jun 17-Sep 25]

Elizabeth Colborne, The Sister Peaks of the Cascade Range, Whatcom County Washington

Elizabeth Colborne, The Sister Peaks of the Cascade Range, Whatcom County Washington (c. 1925), tempera [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Jun 17-Sep 25]

Elizabeth Aline Colborne (1885-1948) was an important Pacific Northwest artist known mainly for her contribution to the Arts and Crafts Movement of the region. In her time, she was also a successful children’s book illustrator. For most of her adult life she divided her time between New York, which served her professional career, and her Bellingham home. This comprehensive exhibit showcases the many facets of Colborne’s artistic endeavours, including original examples of her block prints and a selection of vintage illustrated children’s books.

During the 1920s and 30s, Colborne designed, carved and printed her own editions of colour woodcuts. Characterized by bold arrangements and colourful massed shapes, they often depicted regional landscapes. Her work of this period employed innovative techniques that were highly influenced by the aesthetics of Japanese Ukiyo-e prints.

Colborne studied at Pratt Institute in New York with the influential artist and art educator, Arthur Wesley Dow (1857-1922). Inspired by East Asian art as well as the British Arts and Crafts Movement, Dow published a book in 1899 that became the cornerstone of art education in America for half a century. He encouraged the creation of art using such compositional elements as line, mass, colour and a balance of light and dark forms, rather than representation. Colborne adapted his theories in her own prints, drawings, paintings and illustrations inspired by West Coast scenery.

Allyn Cantor


 Mon, Jun 6, 2011