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Ray Turner: Population

Whatcom Museum
Bellingham WA – Jun 16-Sep 9, 2012

Doug Cranmer, Mosquito

Ray Turner, Population portrait (2011-12), oil on glass [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Jun 16-Sep 9]

Doug Cranmer, Ravens in Nest

Ray Turner, Population portrait (2011-12), oil on glass [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Jun 16-Sep 9]

Doug Cranmer, Ravens in Nest

Ray Turner, Population portrait (2011-12), oil on glass [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Jun 16-Sep 9]

Ray Turner, Population portrait

Ray Turner, Population portrait (2011-12), oil on glass [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Jun 16-Sep 9]

Ray Turner’s ongoing travelling project uses the residents of different cities as the subjects for portrait paintings. Bellingham is the fourth stop on portrait painter Ray Turner’s multi-city travelling exhibition which was most recently shown in Akron, Ohio.

As part of his interest in creating an ongoing series of “community” portraits, Turner visited Bellingham last year to document the townspeople who would manifest into works of art for this venture. Transforming his digital shots into paintings on glass that are 12-inches square, Turner’s 50 new portraits will be exhibited with pieces referencing other cities. This ambitious undertaking reflects a sense of commonality among people while shedding light on the unique diversity present within each individual. As an evolving whole, the collection captures a cross-section of different locales as seen through the painted images of their residents.

For Population, Turner is not rendering superficial beauty; he depicts the essence of each person, rather than their exact likeness. His generously painted surfaces block soft hues into light and shadows with each subject set against a solid ground. Turner’s infused emotion is mostly found in the thick expressive handling of oil paint as well as in his colour choices in the light and dark areas of skin and hair. The uniform approach to each piece allows for more formal considerations in the painting process while paying quiet homage to the collective versus individual identity.

www.whatcommuseum.org

Allyn Cantor


 Sun, Jun 3, 2012