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M.C. Escher, Relativity

M.C. Escher, Relativity (1953), lithograph [Glenbow Museum, Calgary AB, May 25-Aug 18] Collection: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

M.C. Escher: The Mathemagician

Glenbow Museum
Calgary AB – May 25-Aug 18, 2013

M.C. Escher, Hand with Reflecting Sphere

M.C. Escher, Hand with Reflecting Sphere (1935), lithograph on silver-coated wove paper [Glenbow Museum, Calgary AB, May 25-Aug 18] Collection: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa


M.C. Escher, Sky and Water I

M.C. Escher, Sky and Water I (1938), woodcut [Glenbow Museum, Calgary AB, May 25-Aug 18] Collection: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa


M.C. Escher, The Drowned Cathedral

M.C. Escher, The Drowned Cathedral (1929), woodcut on laid japan paper [Glenbow Museum, Calgary AB, May 25-Aug 18] Collection: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa


M.C. Escher: The Mathemagician was organized by the National Gallery of Canada and the Alberta Gallery of Art. The exhibit features over 50 examples of M.C. Escher’s intricate, illusory images, including numerous prints representing the different themes and areas of study that fascinated him.

Although he was reportedly poor at math in school, Escher (1898-1972) developed an early fascination with concepts of space and form. Ultimately, with enormous dedication and planning, he became a research mathematician of great skill. His artwork is largely based on volumes of preparatory sketches – including architectural drawings, unusual landscape perspectives, geometric motifs and mathematical studies – created over many years using a characteristically methodological approach. The resultant pictures of figure and ground are complex, studied and highly refined.

Escher’s fascinating drawings, woodcuts, lithographs, mezzotints and etchings have captured the imaginations of generations of people. The selected pieces span most of his artistic life, from Eight Heads (1922) and Day and Night (1938), to the Circle Limit Works of 1959/1960 and his much beloved “impossible landscapes” and fantasy architectures of the early 1960s.

Mia Johnson


 Thu, Jun 6, 2013