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Gaston Lachaise, Dans La Nuit

Gaston Lachaise, Dans La Nuit (1935), bronze, LF 108 [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Jun 8-Sep 8] © The Lachaise Foundation

MAN/WOMAN: Gaston Lachaise

Portland Art Museum
Portland OR – Jun 8-Sep 8, 2013

Gaston Lachaise, Standing Woman (Elevation)

Gaston Lachaise, Standing Woman (Elevation) (1912-18), bronze, LF 108 [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Jun 8-Sep 8] © The Lachaise Foundation


Gaston Lachaise, Standing Woman (Heroic Woman)

Gaston Lachaise, Standing Woman (Heroic Woman) (1932), bronze, LF 108 [Henry Art Gallery, Seattle WA, Jun 8-Sep 8] © The Lachaise Foundation

Gaston Lachaise (1882-1935) was a French-born American sculptor whose work helped pave the way to American Modernism. He is known for his sculptures of curvaceous female forms rendered with glorified features and elongated limbs that suggest grace and movement.

Lachaise, born in Paris, began studying sculpture when he was 13. He trained at the École des Beaux-Arts before immigrating to Boston in 1906 to pursue his love, Isabel Dutaud Nagle (1872–1957), who became his muse and later his wife. In America, he worked as a sculptor’s assistant on military monuments. Lachaise developed his mature style in the US at a time when Paris was the centre of the modern art world. His unique European perspective ripened in America and, in 1935, he was the first living artist to be given a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York

Lachaise is best known for his great nudes, although he is also gifted at portraiture and produced some remarkable portrayals of noteworthy artists, poets and social figures from his era, including e.e. cummings, Georgia O’Keeffe and Henry McBride.

This survey of Lachaise’s work focuses on his central themes of the universal human form. Over 50 bronze and marble sculptures provide an insight to his singular contribution to 20th-century art.

Mia Johnson


 Thu, Jun 6, 2013