Home Contact | Advertising Subscribe
Search Listings
Alberta British Columbia Oregon Washington
Exhibition Previews
Gallery Websites
Conservation Corner

SEARCH EDITORIAL
To find gallery listings use search at page top right.

  Back

Tara Donovan, Untitled

Tara Donovan, Untitled (2010), relief print from a pin matrix [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Apr 19-Aug 17] From the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation

Radical Repetition: Albers to Warhol

Whatcom Museum
Bellingham WA – Apr 19-Aug 17, 2014

Sarah Sze, 2 (Full Color)

Sarah Sze, 2 (Full Color) (2011), silkscreen [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Apr 19-Aug 17] From the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation


Central to this exhibit, drawn from the collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation, is the theme of recurring imagery in artworks since the 1960s. The show has a strong focus on post-World War II printmaking in America, but also includes some painting and sculpture.

Many pre-eminent artists, including Roy Lichtenstein, Keith Haring, Robert Rauschenberg and Edward Ruscha, are represented in this colourful exhibit. Highlighted is the innovative potential of repetition in a wide range of artistic approaches, from evocative personal and social subject matter to highly developed formal considerations.

Josef Albers’s work Homage to the Square (1967) is a stellar example of the formal possibilities of repeating a geometric form through sets of colour relationships that create different optical and psychological effects. Works by other artists interested in appropriating geometric imagery, such as Sol LeWitt and Donald Judd, extend the theme initiated by Albers.

Contemporary artists, such as Tara Donovan, recall repeating forms that exist in the natural world. Cultural motifs and stylized, narrative depictions with Pop Art leanings are explored in the works of multimedia artists Romare Bearden, Red Grooms and Mickalene Thomas. Chuck Close’s portraiture and John Baldessari’s I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art (1971) are other insightful works based on the notion of a repetitive motif.

The practice of making multiples in both figurative and abstract art often yields poignant subtleties and complex perceptual relationships among a group of images. Pop artists are among the most recognized for using this type of repetition in interpreting elements from everyday life – like Andy Warhol, who is iconic for elaborating the concept.

whatcommuseum.org

Allyn Cantor

Sol LeWitt, Distorted Cubes (E)

Sol LeWitt, Distorted Cubes (E) (2001), colour linocut [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Apr 19-Aug 17] From the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation

Hung Liu, The Last Dynasty: Empress

Hung Liu, The Last Dynasty: Empress (2009), lithograph [Whatcom Museum, Bellingham WA, Apr 19-Aug 17] From the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation


 Sun, Sep 7, 2014