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Diane Jacobs: Cross Hairs

The Art Gym at
Marylhurst University OR Sep 6-Oct 23, 2005

Diane Jacobs - Colour Wave
Diane Jacobs, Colour Wave (detail from installation Cross Hairs), (2005) hairballs and fishing line [The Art Gym at Marylhurst University, OR, Sept 6-Oct 23]


Portland artist Diane Jacobs created Cross Hairs, her strange new installation, from human hair. After shaving her head in 1993, Jacobs felt liberated from the kind of identity that comes with having a certain hair colour, texture and style. Using much of her own hair and hair gathered from friends and family, Jacobs began using it as her artistic medium. For Cross Hairs, she formed sculptural hair balls over a two-year period and hung them in a graduated pattern. On the same wall are an assortment of ponytails in diverse shapes and lengths. Together they form a bizarre milieu that nevertheless brings Jacobs’ personal and cultural perceptions to our attention.

Diane Jacobs - Tube View (detail from installation Cross Hairs)
Diane Jacobs, Tube View (detail from installation Cross Hairs), (2005) toilet paper rolls, plastic sphere, text [The Art Gym at Marylhurst University, OR, Sept 6-Oct 23]

Jacobs trained as a printmaker and has a strong background in book arts. Cross Hairs is embellished with letterpress printed words in various fonts and sizes derived from slang terms often used to describe hair, like wispy, kinky, oily and dull. Hairstyles with odd names like bob, flattop, mohawk and mullet are also woven into the installation using crafted objects made from common bathroom or beauty parlour items.

Diane Jacobs-  Wall of Tails (detail from installation Cross Hairs)
Diane Jacobs, Wall of Tails (detail from installation Cross Hairs), (2005) ponytails [The Art Gym at Marylhurst University, OR, Sept 6-Oct 23]

One piece contains plastic spheres set into an elegant arrangement of toilet paper tubes. Inside the tubes, spheres sport enlarged words. Another piece uses large mirrors on the walls and floor that reflect the viewer.

www.marylhurst.edu

Allyn Cantor

All material © 1996–2006  Mon, Sep 5, 2005