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Timeless Renaissance:
Italian Drawings from the Alessandro Maggiori Collection

Hallie Ford Museum of Art
Salem OR – Aug 13-Nov 6, 2011

Follower of Carlo Maratti (born Camerano, 1625-1713), Kneeling female figure

Follower of Carlo Maratti (born Camerano, 1625-1713), Kneeling female figure seen from the rear and studies of feet, head and drapery, red and black chalk with touches of white chalk on light blue paper [Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Portland OR, Aug 13-Nov 6] Monte San Giusto (Italy), Biblioteca Comunale, Fondo Alessandro Maggiori

Giorgio Vasari (born Arezzo, 1511-died Florence, 1574), Kneeling male nude blowing

Giorgio Vasari (born Arezzo, 1511-died Florence, 1574), Kneeling male nude blowing (recto), Pen and brown ink, with brush drawing in brown ink, on blue-grey paper [Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Portland OR, Aug 13-Nov 6] Monte San Giusto (Italy), Biblioteca Comunale, Fondo Alessandro Maggiori

Anonymous Artist (Roman School, 18th century), Head and shoulders of woman after Raphael’s Transfiguration

Anonymous Artist (Roman School, 18th century), Head and shoulders of woman after Raphael’s Transfiguration, Red chalk on ivory-colored paper [Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Portland OR, Aug 13-Nov 6] Monte San Giusto (Italy), Biblioteca Comunale, Fondo Alessandro Maggiori

A rare collection of drawings was recently discovered in the town of Monte San Giusto, Italy. Initially collected by Count Alessandro Maggiori (1764-1834) during the Napoleonic occupation of the Italian peninsula, the drawings are stylistically consistent with the Classicist tradition.

It is believed that Count Maggiori gathered these works during the late 18th and early 19th centuries as an attempt to preserve cultural identity during a volatile time in Italian history when autocratic rulers were spreading the ideals of post-revolutionary France. Influenced by Raphael’s Renaissance ideals of beauty, the works convey the aesthetics of an earlier time.

The exceptional group of 75 drawings has never been published or exhibited outside of Italy. Willamette University professor Ricardo De Mambro Santos and his students are currently identifying the historical context of this important collection and the schools of study under which many of these drawings were created.

The education of Italian artists included rendering the human form as a foundation for expression. Santos’s research has revealed the names of almost 50 artists, including Giorgio Vasari (1511-1574), Andrea Sacchi (1599-1661) and Elisabetta Sirani (1638-1665). In addition to their historical significance, the timeless 16th to 19th century drawings show a draftsmanship well balanced between sensitivity and skill.

www.willamette.edu/
arts/hfma/index.html

Allyn Cantor


 Sun, Sep 4, 2011