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Nicola López, The Babel Cycle - Still #4

Nicola López, The Babel Cycle - Still #4 (2014), silkscreen and monotype on mylar, collage on archival foam core [Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Portland OR, Aug 7-Sep 27] Courtesy of the artist and Elizabeth Leach Gallery

Nicola López: Forecasting an Impossibly Possible Tomorrow

Elizabeth Leach Gallery
Portland OR – Aug 7-Sep 27, 2014

Nicola López, Infrastructure #1

Nicola López, Infrastructure #1 (2012), lithograph [Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Portland OR, Aug 7-Sep 27] Courtesy of the artist and Elizabeth Leach Gallery

Nicola López is a New York-based artist who has an international roster of exhibition experience, including a recent commission by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her multi-faceted exhibition at Elizabeth Leach Gallery – including installation, video, collages and small prints – uses abstracted architectural forms as the binding element to explore the general theme of the Tower of Babel from the Book of Genesis.

In her stop-motion animation video, building formations that resemble towers or ziggurats rise and fall, reassembling each time as uneasy, wobbly structures before falling again. This cycle of growth and destruction mirrors life and death, ripening and decay and the unwavering will of humanity.

Her silk-screened Mylar collages of mutated architecture, stand-alone compositions of well-conceived linear structures, are beautiful and haunting. With the large-scale installation Barren Lands Breed Strange Visions, López creates an impressive environment of intersecting skeletal buildings – like a pseudo-futuristic cityscape in flux. And with her black-and-white prints on paper, López furthers her exploration of beauty within destruction, using an innovative technique she calls “explosive intaglio.” By causing an explosion on the copper plate, she uses destruction as an aesthetic force.

At the Hoffman Gallery, at Lewis & Clark College, López’s large-scale wall installation, Half-Life (2007) weaves botanical forms into similar architectural concepts with a mild sense of urban dystopia.

Allyn Cantor

Nicola López, Barren Lands Breed Strange Visions

Nicola López, Barren Lands Breed Strange Visions (2014), woodcut, monotype and silkscreen on mylar [Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Portland OR, Aug 7-Sep 27] Courtesy of the artist and Elizabeth Leach Gallery


 Sun, Sep 7, 2014