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Marc Dombrosky & Cynthia Lin:
New Works

Solomon Fine Art
Seattle WA Dec 1-Jan 7, 2005

Marc Dombrosky - Overwrite (face)
Marc Dombrosky, Overwrite (face) (2004), embroidery on found paper [Solomon Fine Art, Seattle WA, Dec 1-Jan 7]

Through careful inquiry and critical investigation, artists Marc Dombrosky and Cynthia Lin create intimate views of things that are ordinarily mundane and unseen. Both artists seek aesthetic truth by considering the temporal significance of otherwise insignificant marks. The process of revealing an unnoticed perspective and giving it importance is laborious.

In Overwrite, Mark Dombrosky creates a series of work based on discarded shorthand notes. Addresses, scribblings and lost letters are given new attention through his detailed embroidering, which retraces faded and tattered lines. We have all tossed out our own jotted down notes, and Dombrosky’s found papers evoke familiar memories. The skillful and tenuous nature of his stitchery gives strength and warmth to these ephemeral subjects. Dombrosky lives and works in Tacoma, Washington and regularly exhibits at the Solomon Fine Art. A small catalogue highlights this series as well as Dombrosky’s past works.

Jack Goldstein - Under Water Sea Fantasy
Marc Dombrosky, Overwrite (00000) (2003), embroidery on found paper, [Solomon Fine Art, Seattle, WA Dec 1-Jan 7]


Visiting artist Cynthia Lin is based in Brooklyn, NY. Lin's pencil and silverpoint drawings, are equally provocative. Her delicate renditions of magnified dust patterns reference such geometric fractal patterning as flocks of birds. Lin’s process is immaculate. She uses either pencil on enamel-coated panel or silver point on smoothly sanded, gessoed paper. Her dissonant fields provoke introspection, as if she is creating doors between science and poetry, the microcosm and the macrocosm.

Allyn Cantor

 Tue, Nov 2, 2004