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Stan Douglas: Inconsolable Memories

Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery
Vancouver BC Jan 20-Mar 19, 2006

Stan Douglas - Inconsolable Memories (2005), film still
Stan Douglas, Inconsolable Memories (2005), film still [Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver BC, Jan 20-Mar 19]


Vancouver-born photographer Stan Douglas is a pioneer of the movement towards projected media – film and video – as an art form. His international leadership continues unabated in 2005 and 2006 with solo shows in Toronto, Vancouver, Madrid and New York, as well as group shows in Germany, Spain, Italy, Austria and Finland. His photographs, films and video installations, once strongly rooted in conceptual art practices, continue to test the boundaries of post-modernist gallery exhibitions.

Stan Douglas, from Inconsolable Memories exhibition
Stan Douglas, from Inconsolable Memories exhibition


Despite their optical perfection, Douglas’ flawless photographs dispassionately capture experiences that are intellectual rather than perceptual. Paradoxically, pieces like the 15-minute film loop Journey into Fear (2003), which ran for 157 hours, engage the viewer at an existential and even poetic level.

Stan Douglas, from Inconsolable Memories exhibition
Stan Douglas, from Inconsolable Memories exhibition


Inconsolable Memories consists of a new film work and a series of photographs shot in Cuba during the last two years. The film work, “Inconsolable Memories”, is based on a Cuban film, “Memories of Underdevelopment” (1968) by Tomas Gutierrez Alea. Douglas’ film re-stages Alea’s story in the 1980s, a time when tens of thousands of Cubans, including hundreds of convicts, fled Fidel Castro’s regime. Inconsolable Memories is a co-production of the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver and the Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha.

www.belkin-gallery.ubc.ca

Mia Johnson

 Wed, Nov 2, 2005