Home Contact | Advertising Subscribe
Search Listings
Alberta British Columbia Oregon Washington
Exhibition Previews
Gallery Websites
Conservation Corner

SEARCH EDITORIAL
To find gallery listings use search at page top right.

  Back

Debbie Tuepah, Data (detail)

Debbie Tuepah, Data [detail] (2010), acrylic on canvas [Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Concourse Gallery, Vancouver BC, Nov 17-24]

Black Holes and Other Transformations

Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Concourse Gallery
Vancouver BC – Nov 17-24, 2010

Rosemary Burden, Cloud Chamber

Rosemary Burden, Cloud Chamber (2009), drawing (triptych) [Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Concourse Gallery, Vancouver BC, Nov 17-24]

Payton Evans, Web Series (1 of 4)

Payton Evans, Web Series (1 of 4) (2010), pen and ink on paper [Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Concourse Gallery, Vancouver BC, Nov 17-24]

In a Special Topics course titled “Black Holes and Other Transformations” at Emily Carr University in 2009, students investigated contemporary art that is informed and inspired by science – in particular, works of art based on themes from physics, chemistry, mathematics and biology. Using science as a “lens”, students then created their own artworks addressing such topics as black holes, chaos theory, particle behaviour and entropy. The course included participation in an Artistin- Residence Program at the TRIUMF Particle Physics Lab at the University of British Columbia, and a collaborative communications project with students from the University of the Arts, Berlin.

The resulting sculptures, films, sound pieces, paintings, drawings and videos have been juried and curated by Emily Carr faculty and visiting instructors from Germany. The exhibition of work by 15-20 artists includes students from Emily Carr as well as pieces by Emily Carr alumni and students from Berlin.

In her own practice, artist and course instructor Ingrid Koenig similarly explores science theories, naming and classification structures. Koenig’s drawings and paintings represent everyday objects and activities with overlays of scientific diagrams illustrating the invisible scientific theories at work beyond our perception. With an MFA from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Koenig is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Visual Art and Material Practice at Emily Carr.

http://blackholesandothertransformations.wordpress.com/

Mia Johnson


 Mon, Nov 8, 2010