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Photo scanned from stereoscopic glass plate slide by Lumière et Jougla, circa WW1

Photo scanned from stereoscopic glass plate slide by Lumière et Jougla, circa WW1 [Touchstones Nelson, Nelson BC, Sep 20-Nov 23] Loan from the Sturgeon family

Bringing the War Home:
3-D Images from the Battlefields of WWI

Touchstones Nelson
Nelson BC – Sep 20-Nov 23, 2014

Photo scanned from stereoscopic glass plate slide by Lumière et Jougla, circa WW1

Photo scanned from stereoscopic glass plate slide by Lumière et Jougla, circa WW1 [Touchstones Nelson, Nelson BC, Sep 20-Nov 23] Loan from the Sturgeon family


Photo scanned from stereoscopic glass plate slide by Lumière et Jougla, circa WW1
Photo scanned from stereoscopic glass plate slide by Lumière et Jougla, circa WW1 [Touchstones Nelson, Nelson BC, Sep 20-Nov 23] Loan from the Sturgeon family


Photo scanned from stereoscopic glass plate slide by Lumière et Jougla, circa WW1
Photo scanned from stereoscopic glass plate slide by Lumière et Jougla, circa WW1 [Touchstones Nelson, Nelson BC, Sep 20-Nov 23] Loan from the Sturgeon family


Until World War II, World War I was known as the Great War. Over 15 million people died in that “war to end all wars,” as Lord Grey referred to it in 1914. Gertrude Stein was later to write: “When the generals before the war talked about the war, they talked about it as a nineteenth-century war, although to be fought with twentieth-century weapons.”

Such a weapon appears in one of the stereoscopic images on display in this exhibit – a partially buried field cannon. Looking at it projected onto the gallery wall while wearing red-and-blue 3-D glasses gives a person a whole different experience than looking at the image through a hand-held View-Finder (which these stereoscopic images were later adapted to fit). The large scale and added depth provoke bigger, deeper questions than one might have at the small scale, such as whether this cannon is trapped en route to the field or exhausted after its work there.

The field cannon is one of a number of glass slides that local resident William Sturgeon purchased from the French company Lumière et Jougla before he returned home from World War I. Many more slides of the collection capture scenes of infantrymen walking along roads. Once projected like the cannon, these 3-D images evoke a presence that can’t be ignored. Are these infantrymen marching to the front or are they in retreat? Was the war they signed up for a gentlemanly nineteenth-century affair, or an impolite nightmare from which they cannot awaken?

Michael Turner



























 Sun, Nov 9, 2014