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Jason Walker, Redtail

Jason Walker, Redtail (2014), stoneware, porcelain, china paint, underglaze and
concrete [Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue WA, Oct 3-Mar 1] Photo: David Scherrer Photography / Courtesy of Ferrin Contemporaryt

Jason Walker: On the River, Down the Road

Bellevue Arts Museum
Bellevue WA – Oct 3, 2014-Mar 1, 2015

Jason Walker, Cage Free Capitalism

Jason Walker, Cage Free Capitalism (2014), stoneware, porcelain, china paint [Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue WA, Oct 3-Mar 1] Photo: David Scherrer Photography / Courtesy of Ferrin Contemporary


Jason Walker, detail of Down the Road
Jason Walker, detail of Down the Road (2014), porcelain, china paint and wood [Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue WA, Oct 3-Mar 1] Photo: David Scherrer Photography / Courtesy of Ferrin Contemporary


This first solo museum exhibition by ceramic artist Jason Walker highlights the artist’s ongoing interest in the inherent dichotomy between natural and man-made creations. On the River, Down the Road is a site-specific installation of meticulous sculptures created from painted porcelain. In these highly detailed pieces, Walker depicts a surreal environment where animals that have absorbed the residue of industrial and urban life are shown as evolved hybrid life forms.

The Washington artist uses elements of fantasy to expose the progressive impact of humanity on the landscape. Walker’s wild and domesticated animal forms are rendered with colourfully painted surfaces that articulate witty yet sombre scenes based on the decline of the natural world and the increase of technological developments. These somewhat playful and humorous creatures speak of the inescapable influence of civilization over wilderness in telling narratives that question our current perceptions of nature. In one of Walker’s sculptures, a redtail deer clad with caution stripes carries a roadway on his side and cars on his back as he stands among a cluster of dwarfed city buildings.

These visually captivating artworks are both stunning in their skill and execution and effective in their ability to provoke thoughtful dialogue. For Walker, they represent “what it means to be human in the present time” – a response he had after realizing that we exclude ourselves from the very definition of the word nature.

bellevuearts.org

Allyn Cantor


 Sun, Nov 9, 2014