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V I G N E T T E S
quick takes on
current shows

09–2012
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

06–2012
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

04–2012
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

02–2012
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

09-2011
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

06–2011
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

04–2011
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

02–2011
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

11-2010
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington

09–2010
Alberta, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington


 Back  Vignettes | Washington | November 2011 – January 2012

By Allyn Cantor

KENT LOVELACE: PEREGRINATIONS Lisa Harris Gallery, Seattle, Nov 3–27 Kent Lovelace has worked with oils on copper as his preferred medium since 1998. Transparent glaze on a metallic surface gives a deep sense of luminosity and radiant lighting for the dream-like quality of his paintings. Peregrinations refers to the exploration and inspiration found in his physical travels at home and abroad and in the intellectual journey undertaken in the creation process. Ultimately, observation and imagination are serenely blended in Lovelace’s eloquent subject matter.

SEEING IMPRESSIONISM: EUROPE, AMERICA AND THE NORTHWEST Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, Oct 14-Feb 25, 2012 Impressionism emerged in late-19th-century Europe and can be traced back to Claude Monet’s 1872 Impression, Sunrise. In reaction to the traditional approach to painting, the Impressionists experimented with innovative approaches to paint, brushwork, subject matter and elements of light. The exhibited works by Degas, Pissarro, Renoir, Cassatt, Sargent, Hassam, Ingres and others form a substantive cross-section of this historically significant movement.

JOANN VERBURG: INTERRUPTIONS G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle, Oct 14-Nov 19 JoAnn Verburg’s new photographs are a departure from her previously exhibited landscape-based subjects. The cityscape images on view are of the architecture and inhabitants of Spoleto, Italy; a city the nationally-recognized artist and her poet husband have visited for over 25 years. With a strong yet intimate sense of place in these works, Verburg offers an engaging visual experience for her viewers. Interruptions is also the title of a recently published book on the series available at G. Gibson Gallery.

ROBERT C. JONES: RECENT WORK Francine Seders Gallery, Seattle, Nov 4-Dec 24 Paintings by Robert C. Jones are more concerned with the structure of the figure and of the page than with rendering reality. The respected Seattle senior artist is well known for naturalistic abstractions and a process-oriented painting style. With time, his finished canvasses become a unified collection of moments visually characterized by simple curves, assured mark-making, strong linear structure, and a distinctive active palette. Paintings produced in the last three years are presented here with a small grouping of etchings and woodcuts.

AN ARCHITECTURAL VIEW Prographica / fine works on paper, Seattle, Oct 29-Dec 3 The four artists in this show use elements of architecture in their work but do not necessarily share stylistic connections other than suggesting a human presence in their subject matter. Steve Costie’s abstractions in heavily worked graphite suggest the weightiness of buildings and Eric Elliot merges form with gesture in diffused studio interiors. Laura Hamje similarly treats the painted surface to connect the natural world with man-made structures while Elizabeth Ockwell’s images are of European architectural sites she has visited.

Kent Lovelace
Kent Lovelace

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Pierre-Auguste Renoir

JoAnn Verburg
JoAnn Verburg

Robert C. Jones
Robert C. Jones

Elizabeth Ockwell
Elizabeth Ockwell

 Wed, Nov 30, 2011