Home Sep – Oct 2021 Oregon Vignettes

Sep – Oct 2021 Oregon Vignettes

by admin

by Joseph Gallivan

Claudia Cave, Light House, 2008 Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University, Maribeth Collins Art Acquisition Fund, 2008.068. Photo: Aaron Johanson

CLAUDIA CAVE: INTERIORS AND INTERIORITY
Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Salem. To Dec 4

Claudia Cave, who grew up in Salem, makes drawings and paintings whose subjects range “from spiky female figures to zooming canines and occasional cats to smoothly excavated landscape forms.” Cave loves interiors, rendered in meticulous detail, and she often shows cross sections of houses. Tiny women populate them like toys in a dollhouse or figures in an architectural drawing. Guest curator Roger Hull says, “Cave’s focus on interiors can lead her further inward, to the realm of interiority – the psychic zone of thoughts, dreams, ennui, and sometimes apprehension.”

Louise Bourgeois, Art is a guaranty of sanity, 1999

LOUISE BOURGEOIS: WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at PSU, Portland. To Dec 4

There is more to Louise Bourgeois than big spiders and big moods. She was a prolific writer, drawer, book illustrator and printmaker. This show presents 119 works, with a focus on prints and textiles. It also has eight holograms from the 1940s to the early 2000s. Bourgeois was in psychoanalysis and her explorations played out in text as well as in images. In asking “What is the shape of this problem?” in her art, Bourgeois makes suffering and artmaking parallel entities, according to curator Naomi Potter of the Esker Foundation in Calgary, Canada.

Clara Barck Welles with the Illinois suffragettes in Washington, DC, 1913. DN-0060283. Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago Historical Society

A NEW WOMAN: CLARA BARCK WELLES, INSPIRATION & INFLUENCE IN ARTS & CRAFTS SILVER
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon, Eugene. Oct 9, 2021 – Oct 2, 2022

Clara Barck Welles was a feminist, activist, artist and maker in the early 20th century. She co-founded the Kalo Shop of Chicago, a studio famous for its elegant Arts and Crafts silver hollowware, flatware and jewelry. The Kalo Shop, whose motto was “beautiful, useful, and enduring,” trained generations of designers, jewelers and silversmiths from the early 1900s until it closed in 1970. This show features works from the collections of the JSMA and the Portland Art Museum, plus rarely seen private pieces.